Removing Bloatware

TLDR: https://github.com/davidemily/DebloatWindows10

Operating systems still blow my mind. There’s a good reason why there’s thousands of applications but only a few major operating systems. When it comes to the big dogs there’s Mac and Windows, and several flavors of Linux far behind. While I have nothing but admiration for those who are technical enough to design the many details of software, I can’t help but be frustrated by the amount of unneeded software included with my OS.

One of my jobs as a system administrator led to building machines using Gentoo. For those who are unfamiliar, Gentoo is a flavor of Linux which allows users almost complete control over the software installed. It’s an incredible learning experience getting everything set up but, once that’s complete, it’s so empowering to have configured every piece of software running. Comparing this to the current Windows 10 installation is night and day.

After graduation I decided to buy a new computer capable of playing some games in my new found free time. I know, I know, the Linux gaming library is increasing but I still decided to go with Windows. To my surprise, apps such as “Candy Crush Saga” and “ZuneMusic” come with the installation. Candy Crush?!? Requests from friends playing Candy Crush was one of the friends I quit Facebook and now it followed me to my home computer? And to think I was upset when Ubuntu started included Amazon and Mahong.

Unfortunately for Windows users, removing this unneeded software can be an absolute pain. One can spend more time crawling through Add or Remove Programs than through the actual installation phase. It’s because of these reasons, I decided to spend some time putting together a PowerShell script to remove some of the bloatware included with Windows 10. The script can be found here or by going to my “DebloatWindows10” repository on my GitHub – https://github.com/davidemily/DebloatWindows10.

This script combines many of the applications I found unnecessary and uses PowerShell to remove them. I also included a script to reinstall the default applications, in case you found yourself unable to use a feature you previously had. I hope in the future these tools turn to be unnecessary but I feel as if bloatware is only going to get worse and worse.